Signing a Letter

O Canada — Who knew you needed a signed document for kids crossing the border…

On the first trip that I was planning to leave the MacBook at home and go “iPad Pro” only was a quick weekend jaunt up across the border to Victoria, Canada. Both my wife and I were participating in the Victoria 70.3 Ironman, so it seemed to be a short and relatively easy way to give the new travel “rig” a workout.

The timing for this trip worked out where we could cross the border by way of the Anacortes to Sydney ferry — but we would need to take 2 different trips. I would head up on Thursday with my parents, and Liz and the kids could head up the following day. It’s quite a stunning boat ride, and really a much better way to get to Canada than hitting the U.S. border crossing by driving.

Need to relax? Take the ferry from Anacortes

While walking around on the ferry, I noticed a document that outlined some of the passport restrictions — specifically the requirements for minors under 18 which apparently recommends a letter of consent if both parents (or legal guardians) aren’t present at the time of crossing the border:

It is strongly recommended that if only one parent is crossing the border with a child under age 18 that they have a Consent Letter from the other parent granting permission to take the child out of the country. It is even more important if the child is traveling with a friend or relative without either parent present… There is no legal requirement that you have a Consent Letter. There is no specific format required for a letter. There is no requirement that a letter be notarized. However, border officials for both countries have complete and absolute discretion to allow, or deny, entry to anyone wanting to enter their country. With, or without, a letter they need to be comfortable that everything is above board or they will start digging to determine if a child abduction is in process.

Hmm… Ok.. I figured this would be a good test of the iPad Pro and the Apple Pencil. My plan would be to write up a quick letter of consent, sign it, take a photo of my passport, and then email it all to Liz to print out and bring with her when she got to Sydney the next day.

I wrote the letter in Pages — then quickly discovered when I went to sign it that it doesn’t support inking. What. The. Hell.

In a bit of a panic, I resorted to signing my name in Notes, then exporting it as a picture. After a quick crop, I was then able to insert the image into my Pages document. Grabbing a picture of my passport was simple — Scanbot is my go to for anything that I need to scan. I then just bundled it all up and sent over the mail to Liz.

While I was able to get the job done — the simple fact that the Apple “work” applications dont support the Apple Pencil at this point is somewhat mindblowing to me. I’d assume that in the iOS 10 timeframe, this perhaps will be fixed, but right now, it’s almost embarassing that they haven’t updated their apps yet.

Since this, there are several great alternatives that I have been playing with for this type of situation:

  • Notes — Seems simple enough, I could have just written the letter in the stock Notes app and signed directly in there.
  • PDF Expert — I could have downloaded the “stock” letter as a PDF, or even exported my letter from Pages to PDF Expert, then used the Pencil to sign.
  • Notability — Recently re-installed Notability after a long absence on the iPad (and iPhone) — looks like they have done a really great job with Pencil support, and I may start to use this as my default “note taking” application.

Anyways — this wasn’t, in the end, a catastrophic failure — but certainly a bit of an eye-opening one, which left me with a simple thought:

The iPad Pro is all the hardware you need, but the software hasn’t caught up yet.